New York State Funeral Directors Association

They Lost Their Heads by Carlyn Beccia © 2018 Bloomsbury

Your neck bone’s connected to your back bone.

And that’s a good thing. You want to be the most together person around, in more ways than one. No sense in having your body parts lying scattered when you really need them all in one place.

Disconnection could be a problem, as you’ll see in “They Lost Their Heads!” by Carlyn Beccia.

Writing an obituary

I got this e-mail from one of the numerous genealogy sites I signed up with, and it had a very insightful lead-in: “Every obituary tells a story.”

This is so true. After reading through a couple hundred obituaries, one thing stuck out to me: what comes after “In lieu of flowers.”

Now commonplace, it’s one of the last parts of an obituary – but I believe it’s extremely important, and perhaps it’s taken for granted.

Image of Cemetery in Japan

Similar to American culture, a traditional funeral in Japan consists of o-tsuya (the wake), followed by kokubetsu-shiki (the funeral).

Services may be held in the home, at a temple or funeral home, or at a local hall, with the body present.

Friends and relatives will visit and offer prayers and incense to the deceased, following the prayers and chanting of the Buddhist priest(s).

Video: Slaves No More

New York's Capital Region honors, re-buries Colonial-era slaves. Found by accident in an unmarked cemetery, scientists pinpointed their African origin and the community held a wake and funeral.

Video: Family History

Today, resources are becoming more widely available, giving people the ability to learn exciting stories about their ancestors. Find 14 great tips on the Blog.

SympathyNotes

SympathyNotes is written to stimulate discussion of death and grief. Opinions do not reflect the views of NYSFDA.

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